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00:30:00

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America 5, City 4, Lee 2, California 2, The City 2, U.s. 2, Steven Rumble 1, Sean 1, Let Me 1, Daly City 1, Bob 1, Jen 1, Mike 1, Obama 1, Powerpoint 1, Like Merced 1, San Francisco 1, Hypobole 1, New York 1, Our City 1,
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  SFGTV2    [untitled]  

    October 28, 2012
    3:00 - 3:30pm PDT  

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in the 19th century and as a result it's very damaging to the environment. what we do is look at how do we consolidate from 9 reservoirs into 8 and begin to build our local water resources to offset a small percentage of water loss that might happen. let's figure that out. let's not have a conversation based on hypobole, in terms of sean saying there are 7 reports saying it's not feasible, that's not true. what's unfortunate about all those is the city of san francisco has boycotted participating in those studies. san francisco says, wait a minute we have a unique responsibility here. we're the only city that stores our water in a national park so let's see how we can do better because we don't do a very good job.
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orange county recycles 30 million gallons of water a day, we recycle zero. we have a great opportunity to guarantee our water future and undo the damage to yosemite national park. >> sean, one point i know is the hydroelectric power generated by that dam, if i remember it's 41 million dollars? do i have my numbers right? >> there are a number of reasons why hetch hetchy is such a benefit to the city, not the least of which is that it produces carbon free public power to the city of san francisco. one of my favorite lines mike just used is this measure is about consolidating from 8 reservoirs to 7. another way to say that is to say this is about draining one of them, the hetch hetchy valley. have other studies
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said this is feasible? sure, just like tearing down city hall or knocking down the golden gate bridge, that's possible but not feasible. we're not going to spend 3 billion dollars to tear down the hetch hetchy dam. let's not forget, we are also stewards for two dozen cities in the peninsula. over 2 million californians benefit from the foresight of our forefathers almost 100 years ago in building hetch hetchy. while the rest of the state is tying themselves up in knots trying to figure out where to get their water. not only did we have the type of water storage hetch hetchy provides, not only today but in the future, we are in a solid place. and to spend this kind of money, and let's just talk about the $8 million dollars, i think that's one thing we can agree on. this calls for us to
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spend $8 million dollars. in my own district, out at like merced, we're taking that amount of money and building a water recycling plant. mike wants us to take that money and waste it on a report. why would we want to spend money to redo what's already been done? >> i upd. that does bring up an interesting point as well with the infrastructure that was voted on and is almost complete. can you address that investment that's already been made. >> absolutely. >> and also with the state of california's report suggesting that 8 million wouldn't be enough to get a plan done. so if you could just address those two points that have come up. >> sure, let me start -- again, go to the report it says again 7 million is what's needed for san francisco to
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engage in the planning process. the larger amount is if we bring in the park service and the state of california, which at this point we don't need to do, we just need the san francisco public utilities commission to get off their butts and start to think about the future more effectively. this really boils down it a 21st century versus the 20th century view of water. sean says our future is secure. it isn't. anyone who thinks our future water supply is going to be coming from the tuolome river is crazy. the one thing we know about climate change is we have to change our water sources. again, we don't recycle any water. we're going to start importing water from daly city next week. we have some plans on the books to do 4 million gals by 2035. that's a fraction. the san francisco
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business times recbltly said san francisco's plans for the future are baby steps and it's disgraceful. prop f is about getting us away from that vision and getting us to plan for the future. >> sean, as a wrap up, the dollars that we're talking about here, whether it's a values debate, that's one thing, that's some of the language that i respect. but when i look at the dollars, i'm not sure, could you dra*e address how that the city and the controller's report? it seems to be a fairly vast effect. >> there's no question, this is a significant impact on the city but let's translate that for our viewers. it's an impact on the rate payers. this is not born by the city's budget, it's borne by everybody's monthly water bill. we know everybody's water bill is going to climb because we have to rebuild our sewer system. on top of that do we want to add many hundreds or
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perhaps thousands of dollars to conduct a rate study that has been done several times that is going to completely drain the stoerplg capacity we have and absolutely put the city further back tomorrow than where we are today? >> we're talking about lettinging the rate payers decide for themselves. it gives the rate payers the information they need in 2016 if it gets back on the ballot. the controller's report is actually quite inaccurate. it projects if prop f passes, a plan is implemented, adopted by the voters and hetch hetchy valley is restored that it will cost $10 billion dollars. that's not what people are voting on here. they are voting on prop f which is simply an $8 million dollar planning process. it's not just an $8 million planning
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process, it's voting for san francisco's future and i urge people to go to restoreyosemite.org and read about it. >> this is a measure hoisted on san francisco by outsiders. every san francisco political group across the political spectrum opposes this measure. this will cost us billions of dollars and it's an unnecessary complete waste of our rate payer dollars. we've done the studies, we know it's a waste, let's move forward with what we're already doing which are significant recycled water projects across the city. >> thank you, gentlemen. we hope this discussion was informative. for more discussion on this and other ballot measures in this year's election, please visit the san francisco league of women voters web site at sfvotes.org.
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remember, early voting is available at city hall from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm if you don'introduce two of my heroes, pat park and steven rumble. [ applause ] >> thank you, so much, jen. and it is such an incredible honor to be here. thank you for america for hosting us, thank you for being an active inspiration, here for us and to the program. which we will talk more about today which was found in large
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part by... and thank you for getting the whole... chief information officer and mayor it is a huge honor to be in your presence as well. >> thank you so much for coming. >> thank you. >> and thank you all for taking time out of your busy schedules to come here today. we are here for a work session. we are actually going to go deep on which... and get your thoughts. so here is actually what is going to happen for the next couple of hours or so. we are going to have a brief context and then we will hear mayor lee make an exciting announcement. which i will introduce the projects and we will do... and break out into session and go deep and provide feedback. i need it and come back together for a... session.
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so,... talk about something called the... which is really an understanding for... the president in charge todd and i and many of our partners in the white house with waking up every single day thinking about how human technology has improved the lives of americans. you may think about... go to just picking up 20 percent of government or making more or providing efficiency in the government and doing lots of that. there are a lot more things happening across the board that were driving forward. but the important part of this is really thinking about outside of the government. how will we have an impact in the lives of americans in so many profound ways. and it is not only easy to
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connect the dots between how we are using technology inside government. and how we are fostering a culture of government going forward related to how young women are in the education program for science or technology and how are we creating jobs in this country and infrastructure and anything like that. so most importantly, how are we fostering innovation in this country, that america, uniquely is founded on the grounds of innovation, we are here in the city where so much that have has happened in so many profound ways. and it seems like every time that we have such disruption in this country. and this time... the financial down turn and the pressure of cyber security and the pressures of so many other things, you know, in... how are we driving innovation forward to champion out of that like we have done over and over and over in the history of this
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country. in the government, plays a fascinating role in that. i will give you an example of a place that we are doing that, that gets the president excited. and that is when you are thinking differently about the digital assets and in last may... in new york and throughout the very non-governmental place to give a speech, got on stage and talked about fostering this of the 21st century government and the digital government and the strategy are things like we are going to unlock the data of government by the fall. taking the rich stores of data that we have in the government and making it open and making it readable, and building application and programming around it in a way that the people can... on the outside. and there are now companies being founded and formed, truly gone public today in the public a few months ago, a couple of
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companies that are largely based on government data, you know, examples all over the place. if you look at the era in which the u.s. government opened up weather data. and not only did it have profound effect on public safety when there are storms coming and agriculture and some of the others, it just provides and helped the quality of life in a profound way, the global positioning system and... almost every night created, 100,000 in economic value. incredible opportunities for doing this in job creation and safety and quality of life and really improving the lives of americans. so it did develop the strategies of 30-plus page document to the agencies of government that they have to work up the data and they have to make this stuff available in the way that we collect it, and use it and public information should remain public and we are going to drive that forward. >> there are a lot of things in the strategy around and the use
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of mobile government and how we summarize the... and think about the 21st century government in that way. and the policy that launched a couple of weeks ago and so much more is being formed that i think will be very transformational in the years to come. >> wh, digital gov in the document, the digital updates, if you are like me you can experience it in a twitter boot strap format. and you can go through that, and i encourage you to not only download it, you know, and pay attention to what was going on and start using the data and start using... available and more importantly think about what are the next level? what is the next gps? how can we foster that? and then give that to us. you know, connecting on
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twitter, follow up on the... (inaudible) sector and today and just let us know. you know, it is actually going to come from here, the government needs to open up this data. we are furosiously doing that (inaudible). >> just to carry the area one step further and, actually... (inaudible) obama created. you want to project? >> okay. thank you. >> (inaudible) created that the us (inaudible) and job really is to be an internal changing in the (inaudible) and the way that we think about is it an incubator in the government. it is not to incubate the economy, it is to execute projects and it is actually...
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(inaudible) program and the present priorities. one such program that is really focused up to date is presidential innovations for... shall we go through... okay. so, then and as an effort that, really have the idea for, basically made... and the whole idea is an amazing... and the government to work with all of the innovators on game-changing that they can actually move forward and... money, and improve it in the lives of americans. and the idea is that the teams work in (inaudible) in part of and deliver... within six months. and so not as a... powerpoint
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or... actual out come and actual change. and they are... the american people. what we actually did was in the version of a traditional (inaudible) and actually... what we did instead was the ground force from within the government a set of... funded by agencies that did (inaudible) external folks to come in and help. in fact, people competed for the right to pay for both. they were actually going to fund (inaudible). we actually... (inaudible) when we lost the program on may 23rd. and you will hear more about
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the (inaudible) next. (inaudible) to work with the u.s.... (inaudible) for six months, right? (inaudible) we have massive, massive response. some (inaudible)... who then started their work in july and in august. and they are off to an unbelievable start working with their (inaudible) to do amazing things. (inaudible) one of the
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primary... (inaudible) is to get your help. because, (inaudible) 2,000 miles... (inaudible) they want to help in any way that they possibly can. (inaudible) before we do that, we would like to announce a very special guest, actually... mayor lee. ... >> mayor lee.
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>> i can't begin to tell you how excited i am for white house... and the (inaudible) president's fellowship program to be announced here and to see a national effort to join the local efforts. i will start out to tell you what happened to me coming a few years when i first started in government. the first years as a very brash and passionate attorney. now i have a lot of strong feelings about... (inaudible) low income tenants and the department of building inspection and fire department. the wave of the streets were conducted that will be safe in the public housing project ts. and during those years, 23 years ago.
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really kind of change... (inaudible) or you have to sue it to change it. of course, as an attorney (inaudible). of course, i litigated against the city for some years and got convinced that maybe that does not end up in all of the best results. so i got enticed by (inaudible) to start working in it and... required the people in the city government who wanted to do better but simply did not know how. the passion was there. the passion from our communities have been there for many, many years. and so, fast forward 20 years later i am the mayor of this crazy place and i tried... (inaudible). and i think the great way of doing that is to model new ways to an old passion and as people who want to solve problems and people who have passion to get other people involved in the
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community and government and people who have a passion to help others. people who have the passion to pledge the welfare of the city ahead of their own success. that is what i want to see happen in government. and so, a lot of it is called innovations because, guess what? i learned very quickly, from years of working with christene and others, innovation is not just about technology, it is about a spirit of being willing to solve problems for a larger (inaudible) that is what i have always kept as a close objective. my role in government. so it is with that i wanted to thank the number of people here, first and foremost, ted (inaudible) and america, and just this place, (inaudible) america that has been really very helpful to insight a lot more innovative spirit in everybody and i said what is your passion? and how can we get people who share that same passion to
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break the barriers of either the lack of technology or education level to really work together to collaborate even further. and so, we were... service, and we are (inaudible) america next year to become partner and tackle the issues that we have been struggling with in government. i also want to thank, mike (inaudible) he is here. mike is the head of a city hall fellows for quite some years. and in fact, i think that he is responsible for some set of (inaudible) of students that come through the city since 2008 helping us and helping the department solve problems and being additional eyes and ears on creative ways to communicate with our citizenry to solve problems and public safety. i want to thank ron con way who was helped me at the ffc, the initiative for technology and innovation.
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and here our new (inaudible) the new chamber of commerce and it is not us, so much, helping them, it is they are asking, now over 304 (inaudible)... >> 305. >> 305. girls, over night. with technology companies that are helping us build a very strong partnership on how to solve the problems that will eventually help create jobs and solve issues that we have watched over for, issues such as how to (inaudible) how do you share more information with where the buses are going? how do you get parking solved in this great city? how do you match up bicycle lanes with traffic places so that each one of them, the drivers and the bicyclists are safe in our town? just a whole
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host of things. here is bob he is the head of professional engineers, because we want to do it with our people. that is what... we solve... last year was a huge challenges in our city. (inaudible) city. litigation for years to come, bob, because they want to work with our labor to try to get successes building. and now we have the opportunity to work with (inaudible) who are going to give us all of our technology, (inaudible) in the city. to excite them, because, some of the things that i learned very early is, people who don't know what we are trying to do will maybe think in fear, is it my job at stake? because of the technology? or am i going to be (inaudible) because of technology? >> and at the end of the day, everybody's job is enhanced not limiting. you will be asked to do more with less. we have to do more and this is where the role of technology
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and our passions come together. >> and i want to also thank our department of human services as well. they have been very active in helping us figure out more on the workforce issues as we try to get more into a modern (inaudible). all of these recognitions are in anticipation of all of those... two of those. the first one, which (inaudible) [ applause ] >> you know, we are getting ready because we declared the month of october the innovation month and that is when we clinched the nationally (inaudible) and the other one that i made in recognition and certainly taking the lead from president obama and the white house presidential fellows. is that we are today, announcing our own mayor's city hall innovation fellows as a program in san francisco. [ applause ]
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>> and collaborate their own passions for improving our city. we made this announcement very early because we want the same thing. we want fellows that have come through for years in the first generation of programs to meet the fellows programs 2021, and global technology and the (inaudible) sector to help these fellows help us. and so we will ask and make applications available for those who want to help us really solve some issues in our city. and allow these things, the collaboration that we have and the target history and the (inaudible) members and other members, we are going to be asking, (inaudible) to step up, not just on the weekend, not just when they have time, this is a business proposition for the city. we truly want to change the way
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that we do things. we don't have to build (inaudible), we can do them through our passion of wanting the best way to do things for our citizen and for our businesses in san francisco. and so, we are going to establish a city hall innovation fellows program that recruits people and recruits companies who will pay their employees to help us (inaudible) at city hall and tackle all of the constant (inaudible) problems whether it is with their e-mail systems or different technology systems. or, whether we can innovate with the public about how to get better services out there to tackle lots of issues in the neighborhoods. we have got a lot of things, that are happening in the month of october. i said that it is our innovation month. and i want to invite all of you to kind of an open house that we have. i think that we have some 74
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different companies for participating open (inaudible). kind of our open house. they got to introduce themselves to both communities everybody, be free to go in and see how people tackle the problems that they are working on and open up that with the local communities and others. (inaudible) we have got open data and it is still something that chris started and jane is now picking up, our chief innovation officer for the city. and james is heading up the (inaudible) data efforts for us to generate more data out there. so the companies are our local, entrepreneurs to create the projects for our city. all of that, in addition to many new things are working with, even the new... accelerated which is kind of identifying the new (inaudible) with the new technology world. there is a